Tag Archive: Reading


Calvin And Hobbes

Calvin And Hobbes

A quick post for today because I’m feeling a bit under the weather: I’ve always loved reading Calvin and Hobbes, comics written by Bill Watterson. I love the satire, the irony, and most of all, the extremely lovable characters. After all, who wouldn’t want to try to explain things to Calvin or try to trick Hobbes or be insulted repeatedly by Susie at school? Watterson does a fantastic job of making his fictional characters come to life, and reminds us all of those times when we acted terribly at age six.
End of book quote: “When I take you on board the Witch, it’s going to be for keeps.” —The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare

Walking And Reading

Walking And Reading

I’ve never understood how people can walk and read at the same time. It seems to be a far-fetched dream of book lovers that anyone would be able to multitask so efficiently. Unfortunately, while I like the idea, I just don’t see how it is possible.
There just aren’t many examples that I can look to for evidence. Sure, there are scenes in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast and Pride & Prejudice of the heroines successfully walking and reading at the same time, but those aren’t real occasions. Belle can’t prove if anything is possible because she’s an animated character, and the creators of the movie easily made it so that she could attempt such a strenuous task without running into anyone. I’m afraid Elizabeth Bennet doesn’t prove much either. She had the benefit of being an actress; therefore I can conclude that she probably was not truly reading the book she is shown to be scrutinizing in the opening scenes of the Keira Knightley version of the movie.
However, I can now say that I have seen a person read and walk in real life. My cross-country team meets for practice early every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday morning at a park about fifteen minutes away from my house. On occasion, we end up exiting the park by the back way as part of our various runs. The back entrance leads out onto a pretty calm street about a quarter of a mile long. That same street is where I first saw a lady walking and reading at the same time. My friend and I have noticed her two or three times now: she is always going towards the park on the side of the road with a book in hand, and so far, she seems to have gotten by pretty well. How she’s managed that, I have absolutely no idea. Personally, I would be worried that a passing car would run over me or a snake that went unnoticed would bite me or some other tragic event would occur; but as far as I know, the superhuman lady has gone unharmed.
The only way I can find out for sure if walking and reading at the same time is possible is to try doing it myself; but as I mentioned before, I am afraid of being ran over or eaten. Maybe the answer to my question is like the one in the Tootsie Pop commercial (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhjb4P_jnKk&feature=related): “the world may never know”.
Before I post this, I want to give a shout out to Letizia and her blog “readinginterrupted” for inspiring me to blog about this in the first place. http://readinginterrupted.com/2012/07/19/library-to-go/
Also, a special happy birthday to my mom!
End of book quote: “But she smiled to herself.” —The Doll People by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin

The Hungry Lion

I found this joke a while ago and thought it was a keeper. For all you readers and writers out there, I think you will appreciate this as much as I did.

The Hungry Lion

A hungry lion was roaming through the jungle looking for something to eat. He came across two men. One was sitting under a tree and reading a book. The other was typing away on his typewriter.
The lion quickly pounced on the man reading the book and devoured him.
Even the king of the jungle knows that readers digest and writers cramp.

As you can tell from the typewriter reference, the joke is a little old, but I am still a fan.

End of book quote: “I take his hand, holding on tightly, preparing for the cameras, and dreading the moment when I will finally have to let go.” —The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins